MIRV Remote Viewing Project

Starting in March of 1986, a remote viewer in what was then called the Sun Streak Program (now, of course, called by the overall name of “Star Gate Program”) was tasked to remote view the warhead of a Soviet intercontinental ballistic missile.  As was required by protocol, the viewer was fully blind to the target and goals of the remote viewing mission. (In other words, was told absolutely nothing about the target. I can certify this, since I, Paul H. Smith, was that viewer.) The only cuing information the viewer received was the arbitrary number 184901  317289.

The warhead, it turned out, was what was known as a “MIRV”– short for “multiple independently targetable reentry vehicle.” In other words, it was missile nosecone containing several individual warheads inside that could each be programmed to seek out and destroy a different city or military complex in whatever country it might be fired at. Here are some photos of MIRVs. I could not find any photos of Soviet/Russian ones, so depicted here are US equivalents.

Photos of various example US MIRV missile warheads

Photos of various example US MIRV missile warheads.

 

And here are samples of the sketches produced in the four sessions (remember, these sketches were produced under fully blind conditions; the only information the remote viewer came from his own mental perceptions obtained through the remote viewing process).

 

Sketch made early in the project compared to an older US Minuteman MIRV

Sketch made early in the project compared to an older US Minuteman MIRV.

 

 

Conceptual sketch of how the "bus"--the rotating mechanism that ejects the individual warheads--fits into the ICBM missile nosecone

Conceptual sketch of how the “bus”–the rotating mechanism that ejects the individual warheads–fits into the ICBM missile nosecone. The photo on the right shows the warhead being assembled.

 

 

Here is a conceptual cross-section sketch capturing the remote viewer's impressions of how smaller warheads nested inside

Here is a conceptual cross-section sketch capturing the remote viewer’s impressions of how smaller warheads nested inside. The photo on the right shows a more modern MIRV warhead from the ironically-named “Peacekeeper” missile (which has since been retired as part of START negotiations).